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since 1880
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Meaning and Origin

What does the name Appeal mean? Find out below.

Origin and Meaning of Appeal

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Webster's Unabridged Dictionary
verb Ap*peal"
Senses
  1. [Law]
    1. To make application for the removal of (a cause) from an inferior to a superior judge or court for a rehearing or review on account of alleged injustice or illegality in the trial below. We say, the cause was appealed from an inferior court.
    2. To charge with a crime; to accuse; to institute a private criminal prosecution against for some heinous crime; as, to appeal a person of felony.
  2. To summon; to challenge.(Archaic)"Man to man will I appeal the Norman to the lists." [Sir W. Scott.]
  3. To invoke.(Obs)

Etymology: OE. appelen apelen, to appeal, accuse, OF. appeler, fr. L. appellare to approach, address, invoke, summon, call, name; akin to appellere to drive to; ad + pellere to drive. See Pulse, and cf. Peal

verb Ap*peal"
Senses
  1. [Law] To apply for the removal of a cause from an inferior to a superior judge or court for the purpose of reëxamination of for decision."I appeal unto Cæsar." [Acts xxv. 11.]
  2. To call upon another to decide a question controverted, to corroborate a statement, to vindicate one's rights, etc.; as, I appeal to all mankind for the truth of what is alleged. Hence: To call on one for aid; to make earnest request."I appeal to the Scriptures in the original." [Horsley.]"They appealed to the sword." [Macaulay.]
noun Ap*peal"
Senses
  1. [Law]
    1. An application for the removal of a cause or suit from an inferior to a superior judge or court for reëxamination or review.
    2. The mode of proceeding by which such removal is effected.
    3. The right of appeal.
    4. An accusation; a process which formerly might be instituted by one private person against another for some heinous crime demanding punishment for the particular injury suffered, rather than for the offense against the public.
    5. An accusation of a felon at common law by one of his accomplices, which accomplice was then called an approver. See Approvement.
  2. A summons to answer to a charge.
  3. A call upon a person or an authority for proof or decision, in one's favor; reference to another as witness; a call for help or a favor; entreaty."A kind of appeal to the Deity, the author of wonders." [Bacon.]
  4. Resort to physical means; recourse."Every milder method is to be tried, before a nation makes an appeal to arms." [Kent.]

Etymology: OE. appel apel, OF. apel, F. appel, fr. appeler. See Appeal (v. t.)

Other Dictionary Sources
  1. (law) a legal proceeding in which the appellant resorts to a higher court for the purpose of obtaining a review of a lower court decision and a reversal of the lower court's judgment or the granting of a new trial ("their appeal was denied in the superior court")
  2. Attractiveness that interests or pleases or stimulates ("his smile was part of his appeal to her")
  3. Request for a sum of money ("an appeal to raise money for starving children")
  4. Earnest or urgent request ("an appeal for help" and "an appeal to the public to keep calm")
  5. Request earnestly (something from somebody); ask for aid or protection ("appeal to somebody for help")
  6. Cite as an authority; resort to ("I appealed to the law of 1900")
  7. Be attractive to ("The idea of a vacation appeals to me")
  8. Take a court case to a higher court for review ("He was found guilty but appealed immediately")
  9. Challenge (a decision) ("She appealed the verdict")
Wiktionary

From Old French apeler, from Latin appellō.

  1. (law)
    1. An application for the removal of a cause or suit from an inferior to a superior judge or court for re-examination or review.
    2. The mode of proceeding by which such removal is effected.
    3. The right of appeal.
    4. An accusation; a process which formerly might be instituted by one private person against another for some heinous crime demanding punishment for the particular injury suffered, rather than for the offense against the public.
    5. An accusation of a felon at common law by one of his accomplices, which accomplice was then called an approver.
  2. A summons to answer to a charge.
  3. A call to a person or an authority for help, proof or a decision; entreaty.
    He made an for volunteers to help at the festival.
    1. (cricket) The act, by the fielding side, of asking an umpire for a decision on whether a batsman is out or not.
  4. Resort to physical means; recourse.
  5. The power to attract or interest.

appeal was also found in the following language(s): Italian

Fun Facts about the name Appeal

  • How unique is the name Appeal? Out of 5,933,561 records in the U.S. Social Security Administration public data, the first name Appeal was not present. It is possible the name you are searching has less than five occurrences per year.
  • Weird things about the name Appeal: Your name in reverse order is Laeppa. A random rearrangement of the letters in your name (anagram) will give Paealp. How do you pronounce that?

What Appeals Have Visited This Page?

Past life for Appeal born Oct 15, 1987

I do not know how you feel about it, but you were a female in your last earthly incarnation. You were born somewhere around the territory of Saudi Arabia approximately on 1600. Your profession was builder of roads, bridges, and docks.

You were a revolutionary type. You inspired changes in any sphere - politics, business, religion, housekeeping. You could have been a leader. Your lesson - to learn humility and faith in spiritual principles. You should believe in High Reason.

Name poster for Appeal

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  • Sources:
  • U.S. Census Bureau: Frequently Occurring Surnames from the Census 2000 (public domain).
  • 1913 Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary via the Collaborative International Dictionary of English (License)
  • Other Dictionary Sources: WordNet 3.1 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University (License).
  • Wiktionary: Titles and License.