First Name
<100
in the U.S.
since 1880
Last Name
330
in the U.S.
in 2010
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Meaning and Origin

What does the name Lime mean? Find out below.

Origin and Meaning of Lime

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Webster's Unabridged Dictionary
noun Lime
A thong by which a dog is led; a leash.

Etymology: See Leam a string

noun Lime
The linden tree. See Linden.

Etymology: Formerly line, for earlier lind. See Linden

noun Lime
Senses
  1. [Bot] The fruit of the Citrus aurantifolia, allied to the lemon, but greener in color; also, the tree which bears it.
  2. The color of the lime{1}, a yellowish-green.

Note: The term lime was formerly also applied to variants of the closely related citron, of which there are two varieties, Citrus Medica, var. acida which is intensely sour, and the sweet lime Citrus Medica, var. Limetta) which is only slightly sour. See citron.

Etymology: F. lime; of Persian origin. See Lemon

noun Lime
Senses
  1. Birdlime."Like the lime That foolish birds are caught with." [Wordsworth.]
  2. [Chem] Oxide of calcium, CaO; the white or gray, caustic substance, usually called quicklime, obtained by calcining limestone or shells, the heat driving off carbon dioxide and leaving lime. It develops great heat when treated with water, forming slaked lime, and is an essential ingredient of cement, plastering, mortar, etc.

Note: ☞ Lime is the principal constituent of limestone, marble, chalk, bones, shells, etc.

Etymology: AS. līm; akin to D. lijm, G. leim, OHG. līm, Icel. līm, Sw. lim, Dan. liim, L. limus mud, linere to smear, and E. loam. √126. Cf. Loam Liniment

verb Lime
Senses
  1. To smear with a viscous substance, as birdlime."These twigs, in time, will come to be limed." [L'Estrange.]
  2. To entangle; to insnare."We had limed ourselves With open eyes, and we must take the chance." [Tennyson.]
  3. To treat with lime, or oxide or hydrate of calcium; to manure with lime; as, to lime hides for removing the hair; to lime sails in order to whiten them; to lime the lawn to decrease acidity of the soil. "Land may be improved by draining, marling, and liming." [Sir J. Child.]
  4. To cement."Who gave his blood to limethe stones together." [Shak.]

Etymology: Cf. AS. gelīman to glue or join together. See Lime a viscous substance

adjective lime
having a yellowish-green color like that of the lime (the fruit).
Other Dictionary Sources
  1. The green acidic fruit of any of various lime trees
  2. Any of various deciduous trees of the genus Tilia with heart-shaped leaves and drooping cymose clusters of yellowish often fragrant flowers; several yield valuable timber
  3. Any of various related trees bearing limes
  4. A sticky adhesive that is smeared on small branches to capture small birds
  5. A white crystalline oxide used in the production of calcium hydroxide
  6. A caustic substance produced by heating limestone
  7. Cover with lime so as to induce growth ("lime the lawn")
  8. Spread birdlime on branches to catch birds
Wiktionary

From Old English līm, from Proto-Germanic *līmaz. Cognate with Danish lim (from Old Norse lím), Dutch lijm, German Leim; Latin limus (“mud”).

  1. (chemistry) A general term for inorganic materials containing calcium, usually calcium oxide or calcium hydroxide; quicklime.
  2. (poetic) Any gluey or adhesive substance; something which traps or captures someone; sometimes a synonym for birdlime.
Avenue of (Tilia) in Prague.
  1. A deciduous tree of the genus Tilia, especially Tilia × europaea; the linden tree, or its wood.

An alteration of line, a variant form of lind.

  1. A deciduous tree of the genus Tilia, especially Tilia × europaea; the linden tree, or its wood.
Avocados and .
  1. Any of several green citrus fruit, somewhat smaller and sharper-tasting than a lemon.
  2. Any of the trees that bear limes, especially key lime, Citrus aurantiifolia.
  3. A light, somewhat yellowish, green colour associated with the fruits of a lime tree.

From French lime, from Spanish lima, from Arabic لِيمَة (līma), from Persian [script needed] (līmū).

  1. Any of several green citrus fruit, somewhat smaller and sharper-tasting than a lemon.
  2. Any of the trees that bear limes, especially key lime, Citrus aurantiifolia.
  3. A light, somewhat yellowish, green colour associated with the fruits of a lime tree.

Back-formation from limer.

From lime (the fruit) as comparable to lemon (a more explicit rating in anime).

  1. (anime) A fan fiction story that stops short of full, explicit descriptions of sexual activity, with the intimacy left to the reader's imagination.

    lime was also found in the following language(s): Danish, Finnish, French, Galician, Italian, Latin, Norwegian Bokmål, Norwegian Nynorsk, Portuguese, and Spanish

    Notable Persons Named Lime

    Lime is a singer-songwriter, dance, rapping, dancer, and rapper. Lime was given the name Kim Hye-lim on January 19th, 1993 in Seoul.

    Popularity:

    Lime Lee is an athlete for the F.C. Tofaga.

    Popularity:

    Notable Persons With the Last Name Lime

    Yvonne Fedderson is an actress and philanthropist. Yvonne was given the name Yvonne Glee Lime on April 7th, 1935 in Glendale, California, U.S.

    Popularity:

    Drop the Lime is an electronic music musician. Drop was given the name Luca Venezia in New York City, New York. Drop is also known as Curses.

    Popularity:

    Harold was born on January 13th, 1928. He died on July 8th, 2008.

    Popularity:

    Rickey Lime is an indie rock musician. She plays Guitar. Rickey was given the name Anna Goodling on August 20th, 1980 in Cottage Grove, Oregon. Rickey is also known as Rickey Goodling.

    Popularity:

    Lime is a singer-songwriter, dance, rapping, dancer, and rapper. Lime was given the name Kim Hye-lim on January 19th, 1993 in Seoul.

    Popularity:

    Where is the name Lime popular?

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    Popularity of Lime as a last name

    The map shows the absolute popularity of the name Lime as a last name in each of the states. See other popular names in Ohio, Indiana, or Oklahoma.

    Ethnicity Distribution

    Ethnicity Lime U.S.
      White 64.24% 64.26%
      African American 1.52% 11.96%
      Asian, Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander 11.21% 4.85%
      American Indian and Alaska Native 11.52% 0.69%
      Two or More Ethnicities 6.36% 1.76%
      Hispanic or Latino 5.15% 16.26%

    Of Last Name Lime

    People with the last name Lime are most frequently White, Asian, Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander, or American Indian and Alaska Native

    Entire United States

    Fun Facts about the name Lime

    • How Popular is the name Lime? As a last name Lime was the 60,960th most popular name in 2010.
    • When was the first name Lime first recorded in the United States? The oldest recorded birth by the Social Security Administration for the name Lime is Saturday, May 5th, 1906.
    • How unique is the name Lime? From 1880 to 2017 less than 5 people per year have been born with the first name Lime. Hoorah! You are a unique individual.
    • Weird things about the name Lime: Your name in reverse order is Emil. A random rearrangement of the letters in your name (anagram) will give Imle. How do you pronounce that?
    • How many people have the last name Lime? In 2010, the U.S. Census Bureau surveyed 330 people with the last name Lime.
    • How likely are you to meet someone with the last name of Lime? Chances are, most people haven't met someone with Lime as their last name since less than 1 person in 909k people have that last name. If you know one, consider yourself lucky!

    What Limes Have Visited This Page?

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    • Sources:
    • U.S. Census Bureau: Frequently Occurring Surnames from the Census 2000 (public domain).
    • 1913 Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary via the Collaborative International Dictionary of English (License)
    • Other Dictionary Sources: WordNet 3.1 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University (License).
    • Wiktionary: Titles and License.
    • Notable persons via Wikipedia: Titles and License. Click each image for the attribution information.