Mask

First Name
<100
in the U.S.
since 1880
Last Name
3k
in the U.S.
in 2010
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Meaning and Origin

What does the name Mask mean? Find out below.

Origin and Meaning of Mask

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International Interest
Webster's Unabridged Dictionary
noun Mask
Senses
  1. A cover, or partial cover, for the face, used for disguise or protection; as, a dancer's mask; a fencer's mask; a ball player's mask.
  2. That which disguises; a pretext or subterfuge.
  3. A festive entertainment of dancing or other diversions, where all wear masks; a masquerade; hence, a revel; a frolic; a delusive show."This thought might lead me through the world's vain mask." [Milton.]
  4. A dramatic performance, formerly in vogue, in which the actors wore masks and represented mythical or allegorical characters.
  5. [Arch] A grotesque head or face, used to adorn keystones and other prominent parts, to spout water in fountains, and the like; -- called also mascaron.
  6. [Fort]
    1. In a permanent fortification, a redoubt which protects the caponiere.
    2. A screen for a battery.
  7. [Zoöl] The lower lip of the larva of a dragon fly, modified so as to form a prehensile organ.
  8. A person wearing a mask; a masker."The mask that has the arm of the Indian queen." [G. W. Cable.]
  9. [Sporting] The head or face of a fox. Death mask a cast of the face of a dead person.

Etymology: F. masque, LL. masca mascha mascus; cf. Sp. & Pg. máscara, It. maschera; all fr. Ar. maskharat buffoon, fool, pleasantry, anything ridiculous or mirthful, fr. sakhira to ridicule, to laugh at. Cf. Masque Masquerade

verb Mask
Senses
  1. To cover, as the face, by way of concealment or defense against injury; to conceal with a mask or visor."They must all be masked and vizarded." [Shak.]
  2. To disguise; to cover; to hide." Masking the business from the common eye." [Shak.]
  3. [Mil]
    1. To conceal; also, to intervene in the line of.
    2. To cover or keep in check; as, to mask a body of troops or a fortress by a superior force, while some hostile evolution is being carried out.
verb Mask
Senses
  1. To take part as a masker in a masquerade.
  2. To wear a mask; to be disguised in any way.
Other Dictionary Sources
  1. Activity that tries to conceal something ("no mask could conceal his ignorance" and "they moved in under a mask of friendship")
  2. A covering to disguise or conceal the face
  3. A protective covering worn over the face
  4. A party of guests wearing costumes and masks
  5. Put a mask on or cover with a mask ("Mask the children for Halloween")
  6. Shield from light
  7. Cover with a sauce ("mask the meat")
  8. Hide under a false appearance ("He masked his disappointment")
  9. Make unrecognizable ("The herb masks the garlic taste")
Wiktionary

Borrowing from Middle French masque (“a covering to hide or protect the face”), from Italian maschera (“mask, disguise”), from Medieval Latin masca, mascha, mascus (“mask, nightmare, ghost”), of uncertain origin. Replaced Old English grīma (“mask”).

  1. A cover, or partial cover, for the face, used for disguise or protection.
    a dancer's ; a fencer's ; a ball player's
  2. That which disguises; a pretext or subterfuge.
  3. A festive entertainment of dancing or other diversions, where all wear masks; a masquerade
  4. A person wearing a mask.
  5. (obsolete) A dramatic performance, formerly in vogue, in which the actors wore masks and represented mythical or allegorical characters.
  6. (architecture) A grotesque head or face, used to adorn keystones and other prominent parts, to spout water in fountains, and the like; -- called also mascaron.
  7. (fortification) In a permanent fortification, a redoubt which protects the caponiere.
  8. (fortification) A screen for a battery
  9. (zoology) The lower lip of the larva of a dragonfly, modified so as to form a prehensile organ.
  10. (Puebloan, anthropology) A ceremonial object used in Puebloan kachina cults that resembles a Euro-American masks. (The term is objected as an appropriate translation by Puebloan peoples as it emphasizes imitation but ignores power and representational intent.)
  11. (computing, programming) A pattern of bits used in bitwise operations; bitmask.
  12. (computer graphics) A two-color (black and white) bitmap generated from an image, used to create transparency in the image.
  13. (heraldry) The head of a fox, shown face-on and cut off immediately behind the ears.

Medieval Latin masca, mascha, mascus may represent the merger of two or more words: 1). a Germanic word from Frankish *maska, mask, mesh (compare Old English mæscre (“mesh; discoloration, spot”), masc (“net, mesh netting”); Old High German māsca (“mesh, ties”)), from Proto-Germanic *maskwǭ (“mesh, mask”), from Proto-Indo-European *mezgʷ- (“to knit, twist”), from the practice of wearing mesh netting over the face as a mask to filter air, keeping soot and dust particles from entering the lungs (compare surgical mask, gas mask, etc.); 2). Old French mascurer ("to blacken (the face)"; compare Occitan mascarar, Catalan mascarar, Walloon maxhurer), from a stem *maska, *mask- (“black”) believed to be of Pre-Indo-European origin giving rise to words meaning "witch, wizard, sorcerer" (compare Old Provençal masco (“witch”), Occitan masca (“witch”), French masque (“brothel-keeper, witch”)); and perhaps another 3). from Arabic مَسْخَرَة (masḵara, “buffoon, fool, pleasantry, anything ridiculous”), from سَخِرَة (saḵira, “to ridicule, to laugh at”).

  1. A cover, or partial cover, for the face, used for disguise or protection.
    a dancer's ; a fencer's ; a ball player's
  2. That which disguises; a pretext or subterfuge.
  3. A festive entertainment of dancing or other diversions, where all wear masks; a masquerade
  4. A person wearing a mask.
  5. (obsolete) A dramatic performance, formerly in vogue, in which the actors wore masks and represented mythical or allegorical characters.
  6. (architecture) A grotesque head or face, used to adorn keystones and other prominent parts, to spout water in fountains, and the like; -- called also mascaron.
  7. (fortification) In a permanent fortification, a redoubt which protects the caponiere.
  8. (fortification) A screen for a battery
  9. (zoology) The lower lip of the larva of a dragonfly, modified so as to form a prehensile organ.
  10. (Puebloan, anthropology) A ceremonial object used in Puebloan kachina cults that resembles a Euro-American masks. (The term is objected as an appropriate translation by Puebloan peoples as it emphasizes imitation but ignores power and representational intent.)
  11. (computing, programming) A pattern of bits used in bitwise operations; bitmask.
  12. (computer graphics) A two-color (black and white) bitmap generated from an image, used to create transparency in the image.
  13. (heraldry) The head of a fox, shown face-on and cut off immediately behind the ears.
  • Derived from the -r- form: Italian maschera, Spanish and Portuguese máscara, Dutch masker, English masquerade.
  • Derived from the form lacking -r-: German Maske and Swedish mask.
  1. A cover, or partial cover, for the face, used for disguise or protection.
    a dancer's ; a fencer's ; a ball player's
  2. That which disguises; a pretext or subterfuge.
  3. A festive entertainment of dancing or other diversions, where all wear masks; a masquerade
  4. A person wearing a mask.
  5. (obsolete) A dramatic performance, formerly in vogue, in which the actors wore masks and represented mythical or allegorical characters.
  6. (architecture) A grotesque head or face, used to adorn keystones and other prominent parts, to spout water in fountains, and the like; -- called also mascaron.
  7. (fortification) In a permanent fortification, a redoubt which protects the caponiere.
  8. (fortification) A screen for a battery
  9. (zoology) The lower lip of the larva of a dragonfly, modified so as to form a prehensile organ.
  10. (Puebloan, anthropology) A ceremonial object used in Puebloan kachina cults that resembles a Euro-American masks. (The term is objected as an appropriate translation by Puebloan peoples as it emphasizes imitation but ignores power and representational intent.)
  11. (computing, programming) A pattern of bits used in bitwise operations; bitmask.
  12. (computer graphics) A two-color (black and white) bitmap generated from an image, used to create transparency in the image.
  13. (heraldry) The head of a fox, shown face-on and cut off immediately behind the ears.

From Middle English maske, from Old English max, *masc (“net”), from Proto-Germanic *maskwǭ (“mesh, netting, mask”), from Proto-Indo-European *mozgʷ-, *mezgʷ- (“to knit, tie”). Cognate with Dutch maas (“mesh”), German Masche (“mesh”), Icelandic möskvi (“mesh”).

  1. A mesh.
  2. (Britain dialectal, Scotland) The mesh of a net; a net; net-bag.

From Middle English *mask, masch, from Old English māx, māsc (“mash”). More at mash.

  1. (Britain dialectal) Mash.

From Middle English masken, short for *maskeren, malskren (“to bewilder; be confused, wander”). More at masker.

    mask was also found in the following language(s): Swedish

    Notable Persons With the Last Name Mask

    Black Mask is a comics character.

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    Tuxedo Mask is an animanga character.

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    Clate Mask is an entrepreneur, author, and entrepreneurship.

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    Where is the name Mask popular?

    International Interest for Mask

    Interest is based how many people viewed this name from each country and is scaled based on the total views by each country so that large countries do not always show the most interest. Darker blue on the map indicates that people in the country are more likely to search for this name.

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    Popularity in the US

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    Popularity of Mask as a last name

    The map shows the absolute popularity of the name Mask as a last name in each of the states. See other popular names in Texas, Georgia, or Alabama.

    Common first names for Mask

    Ethnicity Distribution

    Ethnicity Mask U.S.
      White 73.70% 64.26%
      African American 20.18% 11.96%
      Asian, Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander 1.03% 4.85%
      American Indian and Alaska Native 0.74% 0.69%
      Two or More Ethnicities 2.56% 1.76%
      Hispanic or Latino 1.80% 16.26%

    Of Last Name Mask

    People with the last name Mask are most frequently White or African American

    Entire United States

    Fun Facts about the name Mask

    • How Popular is the name Mask? As a last name Mask was the 9,573rd most popular name in 2010.
    • When was the first name Mask first recorded in the United States? The oldest recorded birth by the Social Security Administration for the name Mask is Wednesday, March 5th, 1924.
    • How unique is the name Mask? From 1880 to 2017 less than 5 people per year have been born with the first name Mask. Hoorah! You are a unique individual.
    • Weird things about the name Mask: Your name in reverse order is Ksam. A random rearrangement of the letters in your name (anagram) will give Asmk. How do you pronounce that?
    • How many people have the last name Mask? In 2010, the U.S. Census Bureau surveyed 3,395 people with the last name Mask.
    • How likely are you to meet someone with the last name of Mask? If you manage to meet 100,000 people in your life, chances are that 1 of them will have Mask as their last name.

    What Masks Have Visited This Page?

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    • Sources:
    • U.S. Census Bureau: Frequently Occurring Surnames from the Census 2000 (public domain).
    • 1913 Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary via the Collaborative International Dictionary of English (License)
    • Other Dictionary Sources: WordNet 3.1 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University (License).
    • Wiktionary: Titles and License.
    • Notable persons via Wikipedia: Titles and License. Click each image for the attribution information.