Preach

First Name
<100
in the U.S.
since 1880
Last Name
<100
in the U.S.
in 2010
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Last
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How to Pronounce Preach

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Meaning and Origin

What does the name Preach mean? Find out below.

Origin and Meaning of Preach

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Webster's Unabridged Dictionary
verb Preach
Senses
  1. To proclaim or publish tidings; specifically, to proclaim the gospel; to discourse publicly on a religious subject, or from a text of Scripture; to deliver a sermon."How shall they preach, except they be sent?" [Rom. x. 15.]"From that time Jesus began to preach." [Matt. iv. 17.]
  2. To give serious advice on morals or religion; to discourse in the manner of a preacher.

Etymology: OE. prechen, OF. preechier, F. prêcher, fr. L. praedicare to cry in public, to proclaim; prae before + dicare to make known, dicere to say; or perhaps from (assumed) LL. praedictare. See Diction, and cf. Predicate Predict

verb Preach
Senses
  1. To proclaim by public discourse; to utter in a sermon or a formal religious harangue."That Cristes gospel truly wolde preche." [Chaucer.]"The Lord hath anointed me to preach good tidings unto the meek." [Isa. lxi. 1.]
  2. To inculcate in public discourse; to urge with earnestness by public teaching."I have preachedrighteousness in the great congregation." [Ps. xl. 9.]
  3. To deliver or pronounce; as, to preach a sermon.
  4. To teach or instruct by preaching; to inform by preaching.(R)"As ye are preached." [Southey.]
  5. To advise or recommend earnestly."My master preaches patience to him." [Shak.]
noun Preach
A religious discourse.

Etymology: Cf. F. prêche, fr. prêcher. See Preach (v.)

Other Dictionary Sources
  1. Speak, plead, or argue in favor of
  2. Deliver a sermon ("The minister is not preaching this Sunday")
Wiktionary

From Middle English prechen, from Old French precchier (Modern French prêcher), from Latin praedicāre, present active infinitive of praedicō.

Compare Saterland Frisian preetje (“to preach”), West Frisian preekje (“to preach”), Dutch preken (“to preach”), German Low German preken (“to preach”).

  1. (obsolete) A religious discourse.

Where is the name Preach popular?

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Popularity of Preach as a last name

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Fun Facts about the name Preach

  • When was the first name Preach first recorded in the United States? The oldest recorded birth by the Social Security Administration for the name Preach is Wednesday, October 28th, 1903.
  • How unique is the name Preach? From 1880 to 2017 less than 5 people per year have been born with the first name Preach. Hoorah! You are a unique individual.
  • Weird things about the name Preach: Your name in reverse order is Hcaerp. A random rearrangement of the letters in your name (anagram) will give Caerph. How do you pronounce that?

What Preachs Have Visited This Page?

Past life for Preach born Dec 5, 2015

I do not know how you feel about it, but you were a female in your last earthly incarnation. You were born somewhere around the territory of Northern Africa approximately on 1500. Your profession was designer, engineering, and craftsman.

You were a seeker of truth and wisdom. You could have seen your future lives. Others perceived you as an idealist illuminating path to the future. Your lesson - to develop kind attitude to people, to acquire gift of understanding and compassion.

Name poster for Preach

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  • Sources:
  • U.S. Census Bureau: Frequently Occurring Surnames from the Census 2000 (public domain).
  • 1913 Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary via the Collaborative International Dictionary of English (License)
  • Other Dictionary Sources: WordNet 3.1 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University (License).
  • Wiktionary: Titles and License.