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Meaning and Origin

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Origin and Meaning of Second

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Webster's Unabridged Dictionary
adjective Sec"ond
Senses
  1. Immediately following the first; next to the first in order of place or time; hence, occurring again; another; other."And he slept and dreamed the second time." [Gen. xli. 5.]
  2. Next to the first in value, power, excellence, dignity, or rank; secondary; subordinate; inferior."May the day when we become the second people upon earth . . . be the day of our utter extirpation." [Landor.]
  3. Being of the same kind as another that has preceded; another, like a prototype; as, a second Cato; a second Troy; a second deluge."A Daniel, still say I, a second Daniel!" [Shak.]

Etymology: F., fr. L. secundus second, properly, following, fr. sequi to follow. See Sue to follow, and cf. Secund

noun Sec"ond
Senses
  1. One who, or that which, follows, or comes after; one next and inferior in place, time, rank, importance, excellence, or power."Man An angel's second, nor his second long." [Young.]
  2. One who follows or attends another for his support and aid; a backer; an assistant; specifically, one who acts as another's aid in a duel."Being sure enough of seconds after the first onset." [Sir H. Wotton.]
  3. Aid; assistance; help.(Obs)"Give second, and my love Is everlasting thine." [J. Fletcher.]
  4. pl.An article of merchandise of a grade inferior to the best; esp., a coarse or inferior kind of flour.
  5. Etymology: F. seconde. See Second (a.)

    The sixtieth part of a minute of time or of a minute of space, that is, the second regular subdivision of the degree; as, sound moves about 1,140 English feet in a second; five minutes and ten seconds north of this place.
  6. In the duodecimal system of mensuration, the twelfth part of an inch or prime; a line. See Inch, and Prime (n.), 8.
  7. [Mus]
    1. The interval between any tone and the tone which is represented on the degree of the staff next above it.
    2. The second part in a concerted piece; -- often popularly applied to the alto.
  8. [Parliamentary Procedure] A motion in support of another motion which has been moved in a deliberative body; a motion without a second dies without discussion.
verb Sec"ond
Senses
  1. To follow in the next place; to succeed; to alternate.(R)"In the method of nature, a low valley is immediately seconded with an ambitious hill." [Fuller.]"Sin is seconded with sin." [South.]
  2. To follow or attend for the purpose of assisting; to support; to back; to act as the second of; to assist; to forward; to encourage."We have supplies to second our attempt." [Shak.]"In human works though labored on with pain, A thousand movements scarce one purpose gain; In God's, one single can its end produce, Yet serves to second too some other use." [Pope.]
  3. Specifically,[Parliamentary Procedure] to support, as a motion{6} or proposal, by adding one's voice to that of the mover or proposer.

Note: ☞ Under common parliamentary rules used by many organizations, especially legislative bodies, a motion must be seconded in order to come properly before the deliberative body for discussion. Any motion{6} for which there is no second{8 dies for lack thereof.

Etymology: Cf. F. seconder, L. secundare, from secundus. See Second (a.)

Other Dictionary Sources
  1. The fielding position of the player on a baseball team who is stationed near the second of the bases in the infield
  2. Merchandise that has imperfections; usually sold at a reduced price without the brand name
  3. The gear that has the second lowest forward gear ratio in the gear box of a motor vehicle ("he had to shift down into second to make the hill")
  4. A speech seconding a motion ("do I hear a second?")
  5. The official attendant of a contestant in a duel or boxing match
  6. A 60th part of a minute of arc ("the treasure is 2 minutes and 45 seconds south of here")
  7. Following the first in an ordering or series ("he came in a close second")
  8. 1/60 of a minute; the basic unit of time adopted under the Systeme International d'Unites
  9. A particular point in time
  10. An indefinitely short time
  11. Transfer an employee to a different, temporary assignment ("The officer was seconded for duty overseas")
  12. Give support or one's approval to ("I'll second that motion")
  13. A part or voice or instrument or orchestra section lower in pitch than or subordinate to the first ("second flute" and "the second violins")
  14. Coming next after the first in position in space or time or degree or magnitude
  15. In the second place ("second, we must consider the economy")
Wiktionary
  1. One that is number two in a series.
  2. One that is next in rank, quality, precedence, position, status, or authority.
  3. The place that is next below or after first in a race or contest.
  4. (usually in the plural) A manufactured item that, though still usable, fails to meet quality control standards.
    They were discounted because they contained blemishes, nicks or were otherwise factory .
  5. (usually in the plural) An additional helping of food.
    That was good barbecue. I hope I can get .
  6. A chance or attempt to achieve what should have been done the first time, usually indicating success this time around. (See second-guess.)
  7. (music) The interval between two adjacent notes in a diatonic scale (either or both of them may be raised or lowered from the basic scale via any type of accidental).
  8. The second gear of an engine.
  9. (baseball) Second base.

From Middle English second, secound, secund, from Old French second, seond, from Latin secundus (“following, next in order”), from root of sequor (“I follow”), from Proto-Indo-European *sekʷ- (“to follow”). Partially displaced native other.

  1. One that is number two in a series.
  2. One that is next in rank, quality, precedence, position, status, or authority.
  3. The place that is next below or after first in a race or contest.
  4. (usually in the plural) A manufactured item that, though still usable, fails to meet quality control standards.
    They were discounted because they contained blemishes, nicks or were otherwise factory .
  5. (usually in the plural) An additional helping of food.
    That was good barbecue. I hope I can get .
  6. A chance or attempt to achieve what should have been done the first time, usually indicating success this time around. (See second-guess.)
  7. (music) The interval between two adjacent notes in a diatonic scale (either or both of them may be raised or lowered from the basic scale via any type of accidental).
  8. The second gear of an engine.
  9. (baseball) Second base.

From Middle English seconde, Old French seconde, from Medieval Latin secunda, short for secunda pars minuta (“second diminished part (of the hour)”).

  1. One-sixtieth of a minute; the SI unit of time, defined as the duration of 9,192,631,770 periods of radiation corresponding to the transition between two hyperfine levels of caesium-133 in a ground state at a temperature of absolute zero and at rest.
  2. A unit of angle equal to one-sixtieth of a minute of arc or one part in 3600 of a degree.
  3. A short, indeterminate amount of time.
    I'll be there in a .

From Middle French seconder, from Latin secundō (“assist, make favorable”).

  1. One who supports another in a contest or combat, such as a dueller's assistant.
  2. One who supports or seconds a motion, or the act itself, as required in certain meetings to pass judgement etc.
    If we want the motion to pass, we will need a .
  3. (obsolete) Aid; assistance; help.

    second was also found in the following language(s): French and Old French

    Notable Persons Named Second

    Second Lord Arniston Dundas Robert was a scottish judge. He breathed his last breath in 1726.

    Popularity:

    His military service ended in 1993.

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    Notable Persons With the Last Name Second

    Simon Fraser The second was a wintering partner in the north west company, north west company, and wintering partner in thenorth west company. Simon was born on May 20th, 1776 in Hoosick, New York. He died on August 18th, 1862.

    Popularity:

    Rudi was born on July 17th, 1989 in Cape Province, South Africa.

    Popularity:

    John Ewasew the second was a Senator for Montarville, Quebec, and SenatorforMontarville. John was born on March 13th, 1922. He breathed his last breath on March 26th, 1978.

    Popularity:

    Where is the name Second popular?

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    Popularity of Second as a last name

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    Fun Facts about the name Second

    • When was the first name Second first recorded in the United States? The oldest recorded birth by the Social Security Administration for the name Second is Tuesday, August 24th, 1880.
    • How unique is the name Second? From 1880 to 2017 less than 5 people per year have been born with the first name Second. Hoorah! You are a unique individual.
    • Weird things about the name Second: Your name in reverse order is Dnoces. A random rearrangement of the letters in your name (anagram) will give Cedons. How do you pronounce that?

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    • Sources:
    • U.S. Census Bureau: Frequently Occurring Surnames from the Census 2000 (public domain).
    • 1913 Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary via the Collaborative International Dictionary of English (License)
    • Other Dictionary Sources: WordNet 3.1 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University (License).
    • Wiktionary: Titles and License.
    • Notable persons via Wikipedia: Titles and License. Click each image for the attribution information.