First Name
<100
in the U.S.
since 1880
Last Name
153
in the U.S.
in 2010
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Meaning and Origin

What does the name Sting mean? Find out below.

Origin and Meaning of Sting

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Webster's Unabridged Dictionary
noun Sting
Senses
  1. [Zoöl] Any sharp organ of offense and defense, especially when connected with a poison gland, and adapted to inflict a wound by piercing; as the caudal sting of a scorpion. The sting of a bee or wasp is a modified ovipositor. The caudal sting, or spine, of a sting ray is a modified dorsal fin ray. The term is sometimes applied to the fang of a serpent. See Illust. of Scorpion.
  2. [Bot] A sharp-pointed hollow hair seated on a gland which secrets an acrid fluid, as in nettles. The points of these hairs usually break off in the wound, and the acrid fluid is pressed into it.
  3. Anything that gives acute pain, bodily or mental; as, the stings of remorse; the stings of reproach. "The sting of death is sin." [1 Cor. xv. 56.]
  4. The thrust of a sting into the flesh; the act of stinging; a wound inflicted by stinging."The lurking serpent's mortal sting." [Shak.]
  5. A goad; incitement.
  6. The point of an epigram or other sarcastic saying.

Etymology: AS. sting a sting. See Sting (v. t.)

verb Sting
Senses
  1. To pierce or wound with a sting; as, bees will sting an animal that irritates them; the nettles stung his hands.
  2. To pain acutely; as, the conscience is stung with remorse; to bite."Slander stingsthe brave." [Pope.]
  3. To goad; to incite, as by taunts or reproaches.

Etymology: AS. stingan; akin to Icel. & Sw. stinga, Dan. stinge, and probably to E. stick, v.t.; cf. Goth. usstiggan to put out, pluck out. Cf. Stick (v. t.)

Other Dictionary Sources
  1. Operation designed to catch a person committing a criminal act ("the police conducted a sting operation")
  2. A swindle in which you cheat at gambling or persuade a person to buy worthless property
  3. A painful wound caused by the thrust of an insect's stinger into skin
  4. A mental pain or distress
  5. A kind of pain; something as sudden and painful as being stung ("the sting of death" and "he felt the stinging of nettles")
  6. Saddle with something disagreeable or disadvantageous
  7. Deliver a sting to
  8. Cause an emotional pain, as if by stinging
  9. Cause a sharp or stinging pain or discomfort
  10. Cause a stinging pain
Wiktionary

From Old English sting.

  1. A bump left on the skin after having been stung.
  2. A bite by an insect.
  3. A pointed portion of an insect or arachnid used for attack.
  4. A sharp, localised pain primarily on the epidermis
  5. (botany) A sharp-pointed hollow hair seated on a gland which secretes an acrid fluid, as in nettles.
  6. The thrust of a sting into the flesh; the act of stinging; a wound inflicted by stinging.
  7. (law enforcement) A police operation in which the police pretend to be criminals in order to catch a criminal.
  8. A short percussive phrase played by a drummer to accent the punchline in a comedy show.
  9. A brief sequence of music used in films, TV, and video games as a form of punctuation in a dramatic or comedic scene.
  10. A support for a wind tunnel model which extends parallel to the air flow.
  11. (figuratively) The harmful or painful part of something.
  12. A goad; incitement.
  13. The point of an epigram or other sarcastic saying.

From Middle English stingen, from Old English stingan, from Proto-Germanic *stinganą. Compare Swedish and Icelandic stinga.

    sting was also found in the following language(s): Norwegian Bokmål, Norwegian Nynorsk, Old English, Romanian, and Swedish

    Notable Persons Named Sting

    Sting is a musician, singer-songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, and actor. His ongoing career started in 1971. Sting was given the name Gordon Matthew Thomas Sumner on October 2nd, 1951 in Wallsend, Tyne & Wear, England.

    Popularity:

    Notable Persons With the Last Name Sting

    Sting is a musician, singer-songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, and actor. His ongoing career started in 1971. Sting was given the name Gordon Matthew Thomas Sumner on October 2nd, 1951 in Wallsend, Tyne & Wear, England.

    Popularity:

    Where is the name Sting popular?

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    Popularity of Sting as a last name

    The map shows the absolute popularity of the name Sting as a last name in each of the states. See other popular names in Michigan, Ohio, or Missouri.

    Common first names for Sting

    Ethnicity Distribution

    Ethnicity Sting U.S.
      White 91.50% 64.26%
      African American 4.58% 11.96%
      Asian, Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander 0.00% 4.85%
      American Indian and Alaska Native 0.00% 0.69%
      Two or More Ethnicities 0.00% 1.76%
      Hispanic or Latino 0.00% 16.26%

    Of Last Name Sting

    People with the last name Sting are most frequently White

    Entire United States

    Fun Facts about the name Sting

    • How Popular is the name Sting? As a last name Sting was the 114,424th most popular name in 2010.
    • How unique is the name Sting? Out of 5,933,561 records in the U.S. Social Security Administration public data, the first name Sting was not present. It is possible the name you are searching has less than five occurrences per year.
    • Weird things about the name Sting: Your name in reverse order is Gnits. A random rearrangement of the letters in your name (anagram) will give Tings. How do you pronounce that?
    • How many people have the last name Sting? In 2010, the U.S. Census Bureau surveyed 153 people with the last name Sting.
    • How likely are you to meet someone with the last name of Sting? Sting is one of the most unique last names recorded.

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    • Sources:
    • U.S. Census Bureau: Frequently Occurring Surnames from the Census 2000 (public domain).
    • 1913 Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary via the Collaborative International Dictionary of English (License)
    • Other Dictionary Sources: WordNet 3.1 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University (License).
    • Wiktionary: Titles and License.
    • Notable persons via Wikipedia: Titles and License. Click each image for the attribution information.