First Name
100
in the U.S.
since 1880
Last Name
119
in the U.S.
in 2010
Girls
Boys
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Meaning and Origin

What does the name Wave mean? Find out below.

Origin and Meaning of Wave

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Webster's Unabridged Dictionary
verb Wave
See Waive.
verb Wave
Senses
  1. To play loosely; to move like a wave, one way and the other; to float; to flutter; to undulate."His purple robes waved careless to the winds." [Trumbull.]"Where the flags of three nations has successively waved." [Hawthorne.]
  2. To be moved to and fro as a signal.
  3. To fluctuate; to waver; to be in an unsettled state; to vacillate.(Obs)"He waved indifferently 'twixt doing them neither good nor harm." [Shak.]

Etymology: OE. waven, AS. wafian to waver, to hesitate, to wonder; akin to wæfre wavering, restless, MHG. wabern to be in motion, Icel. vafra to hover about; cf. Icel. vāfa to vibrate. Cf. Waft Waver

verb Wave
Senses
  1. To move one way and the other; to brandish."Æneas wavedhis fatal sword." [Dryden.]
  2. To raise into inequalities of surface; to give an undulating form a surface to."Horns whelked and waved like the enridged sea." [Shak.]
  3. To move like a wave, or by floating; to waft.(Obs)
  4. To call attention to, or give a direction or command to, by a waving motion, as of the hand; to signify by waving; to beckon; to signal; to indicate."Look, with what courteous action It waves you to a more removed ground." [Shak.]"She spoke, and bowing waved Dismissal." [Tennyson.]
noun Wave
Senses
  1. An advancing ridge or swell on the surface of a liquid, as of the sea, resulting from the oscillatory motion of the particles composing it when disturbed by any force their position of rest; an undulation."The wave behind impels the wave before." [Pope.]
  2. [Physics] A vibration propagated from particle to particle through a body or elastic medium, as in the transmission of sound; an assemblage of vibrating molecules in all phases of a vibration, with no phase repeated; a wave of vibration; an undulation. See Undulation.
  3. Water; a body of water.(Poetic)"Deep drank Lord Marmion of the wave." [Sir W. Scott.]"Build a ship to save thee from the flood, I 'll furnish thee with fresh wave, bread, and wine." [Chapman.]
  4. Unevenness; inequality of surface.
  5. A waving or undulating motion; a signal made with the hand, a flag, etc.
  6. The undulating line or streak of luster on cloth watered, or calendered, or on damask steel.
  7. Something resembling or likened to a water wave, as in rising unusually high, in being of unusual extent, or in progressive motion; a swelling or excitement, as of feeling or energy; a tide; flood; period of intensity, usual activity, or the like; as, a wave of enthusiasm; waves of applause.

Etymology: From Wave (v.); not the same word as OE. wawe waghe, a wave, which is akin to E. wag to move. √138. See Wave (v. i.)

Other Dictionary Sources
  1. A movement like that of a sudden occurrence or increase in a specified phenomenon ("a wave of settlers" and "troops advancing in waves")
  2. A hairdo that creates undulations in the hair
  3. The act of signaling by a movement of the hand
  4. (physics) a movement up and down or back and forth
  5. One of a series of ridges that moves across the surface of a liquid (especially across a large body of water)
  6. Something that rises rapidly ("a wave of emotion swept over him", "there was a sudden wave of buying before the market closed", and "a wave of conservatism in the country led by the hard right")
  7. A member of the women's reserve of the United States Navy; originally organized during World War II but now no longer a separate branch
  8. A persistent and widespread unusual weather condition (especially of unusual temperatures) ("a heat wave")
  9. An undulating curve
  10. Set waves in ("she asked the hairdresser to wave her hair")
  11. Signal with the hands or nod ("She waved to her friends" and "He waved his hand hospitably")
  12. Twist or roll into coils or ringlets
  13. Move or swing back and forth ("She waved her gun")
  14. Move in a wavy pattern or with a rising and falling motion ("the waves rolled towards the beach")
Wiktionary

From Middle English waven, from Old English wafian (“to wave, fluctuate, waver in mind, wonder”), from Proto-Germanic *wabōną, *wabjaną (“to wander, sway”), from Proto-Indo-European *webʰ- (“to move to and from, wander”). Cognate with Middle High German waben (“to wave”), Icelandic váfa (“to fluctuate, waver, doubt”). See also waver.

The wave after a ferry (1)
  1. A moving disturbance in the level of a body of water; an undulation.
    The traveled from the center of the lake before breaking on the shore.
  2. (physics) A moving disturbance in the energy level of a field.
    Gravity , while predicted by theory for decades, have been notoriously difficult to detect.
  3. A shape that alternatingly curves in opposite directions.
    Her hair had a nice to it.
    sine
  4. (figuratively) A sudden unusually large amount of something that is temporarily experienced.
    A of shoppers stampeded through the door when the store opened for its Christmas discount special.
    A of retirees began moving to the coastal area.
    A of emotion overcame her when she thought about her son who was killed in battle.
  5. A sideway movement of the hand(s).
    With a of the hand.
  6. A group activity in a crowd imitating a wave going through water, where people in successive parts of the crowd stand and stretch upward, then sit. Usually referred to as "the wave"

From Middle English *wave, wawe, waghe (“wave”), partially from waven (“to fluctuate, wave”) (see above) and partially from Old English wǣg (“a wave, billow, motion, water, flood, sea”), from Proto-Germanic *wēgaz (“motion, storm, wave”), from Proto-Indo-European *weǵʰ- (“to drag, carry”). Cognate with North Frisian weage (“wave, flood, sea”), German Woge (“wave”), French vague (“wave”) (from Germanic), Gothic 𐍅𐌴𐌲𐍃 (wēgs, “a wave”). See also waw.

  1. A moving disturbance in the level of a body of water; an undulation.
    The traveled from the center of the lake before breaking on the shore.
  2. (physics) A moving disturbance in the energy level of a field.
    Gravity , while predicted by theory for decades, have been notoriously difficult to detect.
  3. A shape that alternatingly curves in opposite directions.
    Her hair had a nice to it.
    sine
  4. (figuratively) A sudden unusually large amount of something that is temporarily experienced.
    A of shoppers stampeded through the door when the store opened for its Christmas discount special.
    A of retirees began moving to the coastal area.
    A of emotion overcame her when she thought about her son who was killed in battle.
  5. A sideway movement of the hand(s).
    With a of the hand.
  6. A group activity in a crowd imitating a wave going through water, where people in successive parts of the crowd stand and stretch upward, then sit. Usually referred to as "the wave"

See waive.

    Notable Persons Named Wave

    Wave was born on June 7th, 1926 in Lafayette, Indiana. Wave is also known as Myers and Charles. He breathed his last breath on February 14th, 2008.

    Popularity:

    Notable Persons With the Last Name Wave

    Heat Wave is a comics character.

    Popularity:

    Air Wave is a comics character.

    Popularity:

    Where is the name Wave popular?

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    Popularity of Wave as a last name

    The map shows the absolute popularity of the name Wave as a last name in each of the states. See other popular names in New York, California, or Florida.

    Common last names for Wave

    • Smith

    Ethnicity Distribution

    Ethnicity Wave U.S.
      White 47.90% 64.26%
      African American 42.86% 11.96%
      Asian, Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander 0.00% 4.85%
      American Indian and Alaska Native 0.00% 0.69%
      Two or More Ethnicities 0.00% 1.76%
      Hispanic or Latino 5.88% 16.26%

    Of Last Name Wave

    People with the last name Wave are most frequently White or African American

    Entire United States

    Fun Facts about the name Wave

    • How Popular is the name Wave? Wave is the 36,583rd most popular name of all time. As a last name Wave was the 140,157th most popular name in 2010.
    • How many people with the first name Wave have been born in the United States? From 1880 to 2017, the Social Security Administration has recorded 100 babies born with the first name Wave in the United States. That's more than enough people named Wave to occupy the territory of Pitcairn Islands (United Kingdom) with an estimated population of 66 (as of July 1, 2008).
    • What year were 5 or more babies first named Wave? The name was first given to 5 or more babies in the year 1897 when it was given as a first name to 6 new born babies.
    • When was Wave first recorded in the United States? The oldest recorded birth by the Social Security Administration for the first name Wave is Thursday, October 29th, 1874.
    • What year had the most people named Wave born? The highest recorded use of the first name Wave was in 1917 with a total of 11 babies.
    • Weird things about the name Wave: Your name in reverse order is Evaw. A random rearrangement of the letters in your name (anagram) will give Vawe. How do you pronounce that?
    • How many people have the last name Wave? In 2010, the U.S. Census Bureau surveyed 119 people with the last name Wave.
    • How likely are you to meet someone with the last name of Wave? Wave is one of the most unique last names recorded.

    What Waves Have Visited This Page?

    Name poster for Wave

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    • Sources:
    • U.S. Census Bureau: Frequently Occurring Surnames from the Census 2000 (public domain).
    • U.S. Social Security Administration: Popular Baby Names, Death Master File (public domain).
    • 1913 Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary via the Collaborative International Dictionary of English (License)
    • Other Dictionary Sources: WordNet 3.1 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University (License).
    • Wiktionary: Titles and License.
    • Notable persons via Wikipedia: Titles and License. Click each image for the attribution information.