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Meaning and Origin

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Origin and Meaning of Wind

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Webster's Unabridged Dictionary
verb Wind
Senses
  1. To turn completely, or with repeated turns; especially, to turn about something fixed; to cause to form convolutions about anything; to coil; to twine; to twist; to wreathe; as, to wind thread on a spool or into a ball."Whether to wind The woodbine round this arbor." [Milton.]
  2. To entwist; to infold; to encircle."Sleep, and I will wind thee in arms." [Shak.]
  3. To have complete control over; to turn and bend at one's pleasure; to vary or alter or will; to regulate; to govern."To turn and winda fiery Pegasus." [Shak.]"In his terms so he would him wind." [Chaucer.]"Gifts blind the wise, and bribes do please And wind all other witnesses." [Herrick.]"Were our legislature vested in the prince, he might wind and turn our constitution at his pleasure." [Addison.]
  4. To introduce by insinuation; to insinuate."You have contrived . . . to wind Yourself into a power tyrannical." [Shak.]"Little arts and dexterities they have to wind in such things into discourse." [Gov. of Tongue.]
  5. To cover or surround with something coiled about; as, to wind a rope with twine.

Etymology: OE. winden, AS. windan; akin to OS. windan, D. & G. winden, OHG. wintan, Icel. & Sw. vinda, Dan. vinde, Goth. windanin comp.). Cf. Wander Wend

verb Wind
Senses
  1. To turn completely or repeatedly; to become coiled about anything; to assume a convolved or spiral form; as, vines wind round a pole."So swift your judgments turn and wind." [Dryden.]
  2. To have a circular course or direction; to crook; to bend; to meander; as, to wind in and out among trees."And where the valley winded out below, The murmuring main was heard, and scarcely heard, to flow." [Thomson.]"He therefore turned him to the steep and rocky path which . . . winded through the thickets of wild boxwood and other low aromatic shrubs." [Sir W. Scott.]
  3. To go to the one side or the other; to move this way and that; to double on one's course; as, a hare pursued turns and winds ."The lowing herd wind �lowly o'er the lea." [Gray.]"To wind out, to extricate one's self; to escape. Long struggling underneath are they could wind Out of such prison." [Milton.]
noun Wind
The act of winding or turning; a turn; a bend; a twist; a winding.
noun Wind
Senses
  1. Air naturally in motion with any degree of velocity; a current of air."Except wind stands as never it stood, It is an ill wind that turns none to good." [Tusser.]" Winds were soft, and woods were green." [Longfellow.]
  2. Air artificially put in motion by any force or action; as, the wind of a cannon ball; the wind of a bellows.
  3. Breath modulated by the respiratory and vocal organs, or by an instrument."Their instruments were various in their kind, Some for the bow, and some for breathing wind." [Dryden.]
  4. Power of respiration; breath."If my wind were but long enough to say my prayers, I would repent." [Shak.]
  5. Air or gas generated in the stomach or bowels; flatulence; as, to be troubled with wind .
  6. Air impregnated with an odor or scent."A pack of dogfish had him in the wind." [Swift.]
  7. A direction from which the wind may blow; a point of the compass; especially, one of the cardinal points, which are often called the four winds."Come from the four winds, O breath, and breathe upon these slain." [Ezek. xxxvii. 9.]
  8. [Far] A disease of sheep, in which the intestines are distended with air, or rather affected with a violent inflammation. It occurs immediately after shearing.
  9. Mere breath or talk; empty effort; idle words."Nor think thou with wind Of airy threats to awe." [Milton.]
  10. [Zoöl] The dotterel.(Prov. Eng)
  11. [Boxing] The region of the pit of the stomach, where a blow may paralyze the diaphragm and cause temporary loss of breath or other injury; the mark.(Slang or Cant)

Note: ☞ This sense seems to have had its origin in the East. The Hebrews gave to each of the four cardinal points the name of wind.

Note: Wind is often used adjectively, or as the first part of compound words.

Etymology: AS. wind; akin to OS., OFries., D., & G. wind, OHG. wint, Dan. & Sw. vind, Icel. vindr, Goth winds, W. gwynt, L. ventus, Skr. vātacf. Gr. 'ah`ths a blast, gale, 'ah^nai to breathe hard, to blow, as the wind); originally a p. pr. from the verb seen in Skr. to blow, akin to AS. wāwan, D. waaijen, G. wehen, OHG. wāen wājen, Goth. waian. √131. Cf. Air Ventail Ventilate Window Winnow

verb Wind
Senses
  1. To expose to the wind; to winnow; to ventilate.
  2. To perceive or follow by the scent; to scent; to nose; as, the hounds winded the game.
    1. To drive hard, or force to violent exertion, as a horse, so as to render scant of wind; to put out of breath.
    2. To rest, as a horse, in order to allow the breath to be recovered; to breathe.
verb Wind
To blow; to sound by blowing; esp., to sound with prolonged and mutually involved notes.

Etymology: From Wind, moving air, but confused in sense and in conjugation with wind to turn

Other Dictionary Sources
  1. The act of winding or twisting ("he put the key in the old clock and gave it a good wind")
  2. Breath ("the collision knocked the wind out of him")
  3. A reflex that expels intestinal gas through the anus
  4. A musical instrument in which the sound is produced by an enclosed column of air that is moved by bellows or the human breath
  5. An indication of potential opportunity
  6. Empty rhetoric or insincere or exaggerated talk ("that's a lot of wind")
  7. A tendency or force that influences events ("the winds of change")
  8. Air moving (sometimes with considerable force) from an area of high pressure to an area of low pressure ("trees bent under the fierce winds" and "when there is no wind, row")
  9. Raise or haul up with or as if with mechanical help
  10. Form into a wreath
  11. Coil the spring of (some mechanical device) by turning a stem ("wind your watch")
  12. Arrange or or coil around
  13. To move or cause to move in a sinuous, spiral, or circular course ("the river winds through the hills")
  14. Catch the scent of; get wind of
  15. Extend in curves and turns ("The road winds around the lake")
Wiktionary

From Middle English wind, from Old English wind (“wind”), from Proto-Germanic *windaz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂wéh₁n̥ts (“wind”) (non-Anatolian Proto-Indo-European *h₂wéh₁n̥tos (“wind”)) derived from the present participle of *h₂weh₁- (“to blow”). Cognate with Dutch wind, German Wind, West Frisian wyn, Norwegian and Swedish vind, Latin ventus, Welsh gwynt, Sanskrit vāta (vāta) perhaps Albanian bundë (“strong damp wind”).

  1. (countable, uncountable) Real or perceived movement of atmospheric air usually caused by convection or differences in air pressure.
    The blew through her hair as she stood on the deck of the ship.
    As they accelerated onto the motorway, the tore the plywood off the car's roof-rack.
    The in Chicago are fierce.
  2. Air artificially put in motion by any force or action.
    the of a cannon ball;  the of a bellows
  3. (countable, uncountable) The ability to breathe easily.
    After the second lap he was already out of .
    The fall knocked the out of him.
  4. News of an event, especially by hearsay or gossip. (Used with catch, often in the past tense.)
    Steve caught of Martha's dalliance with his best friend.
  5. (India and Japan) One of the five basic elements (see Wikipedia article on the Classical elements).
  6. (uncountable, colloquial) Flatus.
    Eww. Someone just passed .
  7. Breath modulated by the respiratory and vocal organs, or by an instrument.
  8. A direction from which the wind may blow; a point of the compass; especially, one of the cardinal points, which are often called the "four winds".
  9. A disease of sheep, in which the intestines are distended with air, or rather affected with a violent inflammation. It occurs immediately after shearing.
  10. Mere breath or talk; empty effort; idle words.
  11. A bird, the dotterel.
  12. (boxing, slang) The region of the solar plexus, where a blow may paralyze the diaphragm and cause temporary loss of breath or other injury.

From Middle English winden, from Old English windan, from Proto-Germanic *windaną. Compare West Frisian wine, Low German winden, Dutch winden, German winden, Danish vinde, Walloon windea. See also the related term wend.

  1. The act of winding or turning; a turn; a bend; a twist.

    wind was also found in the following language(s): Dutch and Old English

    Notable Persons Named Wind

    Wind Dancer is a comics character.

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    Notable Persons With the Last Name Wind

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    Lord Dark Wind is a comics character.

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    Hans Wind is a military person. His military service ended in 1945.

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    Swift is also known as Spirit.

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    Edmund De Wind is a military person. His military service ended in 1917.

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    Where is the name Wind popular?

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    Popularity of Wind as a last name

    The map shows the absolute popularity of the name Wind as a last name in each of the states. See other popular names in New York, Illinois, or California.

    Ethnicity Distribution

    Ethnicity Wind U.S.
      White 82.19% 64.26%
      African American 1.26% 11.96%
      Asian, Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander 0.69% 4.85%
      American Indian and Alaska Native 10.92% 0.69%
      Two or More Ethnicities 2.69% 1.76%
      Hispanic or Latino 2.25% 16.26%

    Of Last Name Wind

    People with the last name Wind are most frequently White or American Indian and Alaska Native

    Entire United States

    Fun Facts about the name Wind

    • How Popular is the name Wind? As a last name Wind was the 13,233rd most popular name in 2010.
    • When was the first name Wind first recorded in the United States? The oldest recorded birth by the Social Security Administration for the name Wind is Thursday, November 21st, 1912.
    • How unique is the name Wind? From 1880 to 2017 less than 5 people per year have been born with the first name Wind. Hoorah! You are a unique individual.
    • Weird things about the name Wind: Your name in reverse order is Dniw. A random rearrangement of the letters in your name (anagram) will give Dinw. How do you pronounce that?
    • How many people have the last name Wind? In 2010, the U.S. Census Bureau surveyed 2,308 people with the last name Wind.
    • How likely are you to meet someone with the last name of Wind? Chances are, most people haven't met someone with Wind as their last name since less than 1 person in 128k people have that last name. If you know one, consider yourself lucky!

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    • Sources:
    • U.S. Census Bureau: Frequently Occurring Surnames from the Census 2000 (public domain).
    • 1913 Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary via the Collaborative International Dictionary of English (License)
    • Other Dictionary Sources: WordNet 3.1 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University (License).
    • Wiktionary: Titles and License.
    • Notable persons via Wikipedia: Titles and License. Click each image for the attribution information.